Japanese Journal of Community Psychology
Online ISSN : 2434-2041
Print ISSN : 1342-8691
Volume 17 , Issue 2
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
Special Issues
  • Nao Takahashi
    2014 Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 109-110
    Published: March 28, 2014
    Released: May 24, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Katsuhiko Uemura
    2014 Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 111-130
    Published: March 28, 2014
    Released: May 24, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Can community psychology do the contribution of what kind of contents to the environmental conservation issues? Environmental sociology puts emphasis on the viewpoints not usual adaptive management but adaptive governance as an answer for the question of "Why doesn’t environmental conservation go well?" This way of thinking can harmonize with the viewpoints of community psychology. So, three points of the following are proposed as a main contribution plan from community psychology in this paper with referring to this viewpoint. Firstly, it is the renouncement of value free in the research, and this means to be a party to the citizen’s position. The second is the importance of collaborative research with the community, and proposes two of the next: ①the environmental conservation study as the community should be keep the five principles of community research partnerships which Dalton et al.(2001) say, and ②utilization of participatory action research as the research method. Finally, in the viewpoint of the philosophy of community psychology, I want to point out four of the next: ①respect for diversity and preparation of alternatives, ②sense of community, ③citizen participation and empowerment, and ④social change. Throughout these viewpoints, it will be expect that the environmental conservation issues are developed well by aiming at the social change of the bottom-up type that citizens are involved.

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  • Hiroshi Nonami
    2014 Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 131-144
    Published: March 28, 2014
    Released: May 24, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In order to develop social governance to manage natural resources, all actors around the commons have to make a consensus on who should be approved rights to manage them, and on what are reasons or values to prove the rights. This article defined legitimacy as approachability of others’ or one’s own rights to manage commons and discussed on theoretical or practical means for investigating the legitimacy based on results of surveys in Okinawa prefecture, Inner Mongolia autonomous region, and experiments using a simulation gaming. The surveys in Okinawa suggested that consistency of judgments to legitimacy among actors put governance managing coral reef into effect appropriately, and also revealed that institutional substance like legality interfered on perceived substance such as trustworthiness to judge legitimacy among people. Another research in Inner Mongolia indicated inconsistency of legitimacy among actors in accordance with their different evaluation of grass-land. Moreover, results of a simulation gaming “Who & Why Game” revealed that deliberate among actors shifted their mutual approval structure of legitimacy. Importance of frame of legitimacy on managing of commons, or making public policies was discussed.

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  • Junichi Takeda
    2014 Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 145-165
    Published: March 28, 2014
    Released: May 24, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Satoyama landscape had been managed by traditional human-nature relationship among residents and farmers within the community. However, due to the aging and outflow of population, it is becoming impossible to solve problem and manage natural environment only by the members of the local community. I discussed the method of managing natural environment and the solution of regional environmental problems. 1) studies in order to solve social problems within the local community. 2) how we solve the task in conjunction with urban residents. 3) study of work procedures and examination for conservation of natural environment.

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  • Nao Takahashi, Mitsukiyo Tani
    2014 Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 166-181
    Published: March 28, 2014
    Released: May 24, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    What kind of contributions can psychological activities bring to a field of biodiversity conservation activities? In this paper, a certain company’s field for biodiversity conservation activities “Hitachi IT Eco Experimental Village (Eco Village)” was introduced, and psychological activities as a volunteer action management were explained with actual examples. Volunteer action management in Eco Village were thought in accordance to a PDCA method which is one of management methods.

    The psychological activities introduced in this paper were as follows; ①meetings (formal plan), ②early morning open cafe (informal plan), ③cooperative activities with local organizations, ④research activities.

    These psychological activities were brought about with people involved in Eco Village to grasp the needs of local people, landlords and urban volunteers, and to gain information to plan activities for cooperation with more people.

    As a result of reviewing the activities in a work environment where multi layer roles and values co-exist, it was confirmed that mutual consent is necessary by sharing and visualization various values & information from a common information platform.

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Original Article
  • Shinya Tanibuchi, Jun Takata, Ken-ichi Kodama
    2014 Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 182-198
    Published: March 28, 2014
    Released: May 24, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This study investigated the psychological process of newcomer children who had entered high school. For this purpose, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine newcomer children who had successfully entered high school. Interview data were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. The results suggested the following. (1) Even though they were successful in the entrance exam, newcomer children once had an experience of losing their motivations to learn due to previous experiences of difficulties. (2) Despite such experiences, as a result of educational and psychological supports provided by the school, family, and community, they were motivated to continue to learn. (3) Collaboration among the family, school, and community was effective for promoting children’s academic efforts and facilitating cultural integration. (4) It was important for parents to encourage their children to make academic efforts by expressing what parents expected from their children through words. (5) And it was necessary to demonstrate parents’ interest by taking part in educational activities. (6) Entering high school might trigger identity formation among newcomer children.

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  • Aki Nishino
    2014 Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 199-218
    Published: March 28, 2014
    Released: May 24, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Individuals with gender dysphoria experience incongruence between their experienced and assigned genders. Despite the dire needs, there is currently little research on professional services for reducing the psychosocial problems experienced by people with gender dysphoria. Therefore, the author explored the process of re-constructing psychosocial identity by examining 16 participants’ accounts of their male-to-female transitions (or transitions to an alternative, non-male gender; M to F/X) using the modified grounded theory approach.

    Results indicated that (a) sex dualism causes serious self-loathing in people with gender dysphoria; (b) such people often experience pleasure when acknowledged by others; and (c) people with gender dysphoria can achieve a sense of psychosocial well-being by discovering a unique position for themselves within the community,

    Thus, people with gender dysphoria can experience psychosocial well-being during the M to FIX transition if they find their unique positions within society and feel recognized by others. Psychologists should aim to further help people with gender dysphoria connect with those without it and integrate into the cultural and social frameworks; this can be done through psycho-education, raising awareness about sex/gender dualism, and enhancing the advocacy and empowerment of people with gender dysphoria, allowing them to live with support for their alternative identities.

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  • Sachiko Kurosawa, Aki Nishino
    2014 Volume 17 Issue 2 Pages 219-238
    Published: March 28, 2014
    Released: May 24, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    On March 11, 2011, the students of junior high school “A” in Onagawa were impacted by the tsunami that followed the Great East Japan Earthquake. In May 2011, two months after the disaster, the students in the “haiku-renku school program” composed haikus, which were recorded onto DVDs and rocketed to outer space. This study employed the Kl-method to examine these haikus and the written impressions of the students’ experiences of the haiku composition program about one year after its completion.

    According to the results, (a) the first graders survived their suffering by enthusiastically creating a slogan-like phrase; (b) the second graders developed a sense of collective unity and security by reading each other’s haikus, and (c) the third graders’ will to their restoration encouraged themselves in writing. Students said that haiku composition was not easy because of the limit placed on words. However, using short expressions allowed them to express themselves directly.

    The results suggest that the fixed form of haiku (i.e., a rhythmical syllable pattern of 5-7-5) is very useful in safely expressing students’ experiences of the disaster. Moreover, the perspective of space brings a sense of mutual connectedness. Therefore, we conclude that the “haiku-renku school program” provided good psychological self-help for students after the disaster.

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